Mark 10:43-45

Whoever would be great among you must be your servant, and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. For even the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many

When Paul wanted to cultivate humility in the members of a local church, he took them straight to the gospel. In fact, Philippians 2:5-11, Paul describes the humility of Jesus in His incarnation, obedience, and death. And when Jesus taught His disciples servanthood, He pointed them to His own vocation as Servant, to be both their highest example and deepest motive for serving others. Our humility is the fruit of, and a response to, the humility of Christ Himself. The only way we’ll be freed from the pride of boasting in ourselves is if we find a more worthy object in which to boast and to worship. That’s why the wisdom of Scripture never simply says, “Do not boast, but be humble”; instead it directs us to “boast in the Lord” (Psalm 34:2; Jeremiah 9:23-24; 1 Corinthians 1:26-31) and to “boast in the cross.” As Paul wrote in Galatians 6:14, “Far be it from me to boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.”

Note the three things people tend to glory in. Some people boast in wisdom, whether in the form of education, natural intelligence, practical know-how, or wit and cleverness. Others tend to boast in might—a sharp physique, physical strength, fitness, muscle tone, beauty, & AWESOME BEARDS. Still others are proud of riches—wealth, prosperity, success, affluence. But God says we should glory in understanding and knowing God, not in our own human distinctions and accomplishments. One of the most important keys to humility is a sight of the satisfying God who is infinitely greater than we are.

Dan Ousley - Worship Leader - StoneBridge Baptist Church

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